Articles2020-06-23T00:56:12+00:00



Articles

When I’m not obsessing over the career of Jeff Goldblum, I also write any number of news articles, features, profiles and cultural criticism. These days, I do it for The Washington Post. Before that, I wrote for anyone who would have me, including Esquire, GQ, Time, Southern Living and a variety of other extremely kind publications that gave me money for words. Here are a few of my favorite pieces.

No, I don’t want to know how many burritos I ate this year

THE WASHINGTON POST  |  Dec. 29, 2023

Ah, December, when inboxes overflow with corporations defining your tastes and habits — your id, your ego, your very soul — from the past 12 months.

Strava reminds you that you didn’t meet your jogging goal for the year.

Peloton implies that you could have cycled more.

Food delivery apps present unfathomable statistics for the 2023 dining season. Unlike with takeout, this caloric imbalance is difficult to swallow.

The Washington Post tells you how many pieces you’ve read. You mostly chose stories by Travis M. Andrews. You realize you are Travis M. Andrews. You Google “narcissism.”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Billy Crystal is the last of his kind

THE WASHINGTON POST  |  Dec. 5, 2023

NEW YORK — What are you doing?

Billy Crystal was in his mid-20s when he began asking himself this. As a substitute teacher on Long Island, he made ends meet for his wife and 6-month-old daughter, but he spent the rest of his time in a New York sketch-comedy troupe on the long road to nowhere. He began having anxiety attacks.

You’re a father. What are you doing?

Janice, his wife, sat him down …

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

The radical earnestness of Tony P

THE WASHINGTON POST  |  Sept. 18, 2023

On a top floor of a glass-walled apartment building on a brutalist stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue, somewhere between the Oval Office and the Senate chamber, past a bored concierge, up an elevator, down an endless hallway, in a sterile apartment filled with rented furniture, Tony P studies his salmon.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Tom Fontana is furious. And thinks you should be, too.

THE WASHINGTON POST  |  Sept. 1, 2023

NEW YORK — Tom Fontana’s fiefdom fits neatly in a red-brick, four-story, 19th-century West Village townhouse — its colossal, multistory windows befitting the library it was and still, in part, remains. Fontana bought and refurbished the building in 1997 with the relative fortune he made in an earlier golden age of TV — from his first writing break on “St. Elsewhere,” the ’80s NBC drama about a teaching hospital, then onward as writer-producer for NBC’s “Homicide: Life on the Street” in the ’90s, then as creator of “Oz,” the admired HBO prison drama that ended in 2003.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Are the Walkmen finally back together, or did they never break up?

THE WASHINGTON POST  |  May 4, 2023

WESTERLY, R.I. — Let’s get one thing straight: The Walkmen never broke up.

You’d be forgiven if you thought they had. The New York-via-D. C. rockers — consisting of first cousins Hamilton Leithauser and Walter Martin and their childhood friends Paul Maroon, Peter Bauer and Matt Barrick — did stop playing shows and releasing new music in early 2014. But they’re adamant they never broke up.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

This is not a story about Bruce Willis

THE WASHINGTON POST  | April 7, 2022

No two creatures — including those that clone themselves — are perfect copies. Even identical twins aren’t actually identical. But what’s a rule without an exception?

Bruce Willis, the last Boy Scout, entered the world in Idar-Oberstein, West Germany, on March 19, 1955. Some 4,000 miles away and 14 years later, Eric Buarque was born in Cheverly, Md.

And yet.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Spotify backlash offers rare insight into reeling music industry — and struggles of working musicians

THE WASHINGTON POST | Feb. 14, 2022

India.Arie was already tired of the meager checks she was receiving from Spotify when Neil Young decided to bolt from the platform.

Young had clashed with the streaming service over its popular podcast host, Joe Rogan, whom he accused of spreading coronavirus misinformation. The Grammy-winning R&B singer decided she would leave too, citing the low pay and Rogan’s “language around race.”

“So often, we need someone more powerful, someone people actually listen to, to open the door,” Arie said in an interview. So, “when Neil Young opened the door, I walked through, too.”

Leaving, though, proved difficult.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Here’s why deep down we like rewatching the same old movies and shows — especially during the pandemic

THE WASHINGTON POST  | Feb. 18, 2021

Many have escalated their rewatching of favorite movies and TV shows during the pandemic, finding them to be creature comforts while stranded in their homes indefinitely, especially with the ever-growing number of streaming services making this content just a click away. All this rewatching raises the question: What makes something rewatchable in the first place, beyond the simple fact that you liked it?

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

The handwarming story of how Bernie Sanders got his inauguration mittens

THE WASHINGTON POST  | Jan. 20, 2021

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) sits alone at the inauguration ceremony in a beige parka, legs and arms crossed, socially distanced. Hugging his hands are a pair of large mittens bearing a white and brown pattern. They look soft. They look warm. They look vaguely familiar.

Of all the historic images from the inauguration of Joe Biden as the 46th president, this might be the most unexpected. But a photo of Sanders bundled up against the Washington cold went viral almost immediately.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Go to Top